Emancipation

I'm Veronika, and I'm 21.

Basically, this is just whatever I find interesting currently. Unfortunately, this changes often.

Consistencies include: Jeff Bridges, polar bears, food (specifically breakfast), beards and space. And dinosaurs.

Cheers.

the appropriate response to slut-shaming [x]

Reporter: When girls are young they like the attention guys give them, but then when they get older they start shouting and saying they’ve been exploited.

Pari: Are we torturing you? We are forcing you to be with us? I’m sorry that you are so tortured.

(via textsfrommirzaghalib)

queerboiswag:

cakeandrevolution:

I want to see a reality tv show where straight dudes have to read the shitty messages they send to women to their mothers.

i would die laughing

(via lifestylech0ice)

aseaofquotes:

Matthew Quick, The Silver Linings Playbook

162 plays
TV on the Radio,
Young Liars

generic-art:

TV on the Radio - Satellite

(via heavyfeatherreview)

hexabeast:

alleecat2:

the-bucky-barnes:

My cat loves when we play CAH because she squeezes into the box and becomes some kind of monorail…

Cats Against Humanity

THe biggest, blackest cat

(via awkdinosaur)

there and back again

(via creekdontrise)

Teachers are often unaware of the gender distribution of talk in their classrooms. They usually consider that they give equal amounts of attention to girls and boys, and it is only when they make a tape recording that they realize that boys are dominating the interactions. Dale Spender, an Australian feminist who has been a strong advocate of female rights in this area, noted that teachers who tried to restore the balance by deliberately ‘favouring’ the girls were astounded to find that despite their efforts they continued to devote more time to the boys in their classrooms. Another study reported that a male science teacher who managed to create an atmosphere in which girls and boys contributed more equally to discussion felt that he was devoting 90 per cent of his attention to the girls. And so did his male pupils. They complained vociferously that the girls were getting too much talking time.

In other public contexts, too, such as seminars and debates, when women and men are deliberately given an equal amount of the highly valued talking time, there is often a perception that they are getting more than their fair share. Dale Spender explains this as follows:

“The talkativeness of women has been gauged in comparison not with men but with silence. Women have not been judged on the grounds of whether they talk more than men, but of whether they talk more than silent women.”

In other words, if women talk at all, this may be perceived as ‘too much’ by men who expect them to provide a silent, decorative background in many social contexts.